International Day of Non-Violence

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International Day of Non-Violence

“We may never be strong enough to be entirely nonviolent in thought, word, and deed. But we must keep nonviolence as our goal and make strong progress towards it.” - Mahatma Gandhi

The name of Mahatma Gandhi transcends the bounds of race, religion, and nation-states. Today, on 2 October, we celebrate the birthday of a man who helped bring forward the notion of “non-violence”. He is also remembered for his passionate adherence to the practice of nonviolence and supreme humanism.

On the International Day of Non-Violence, created by the United Nations in 2007, we look back on how Gandhi’s work and legacy has impacted global non-violent protests, marches, and vigils. This day is recognised and commemorated as a means of reaffirming the universal relevance of the principle of non-violence and the desire to secure a culture of peace, tolerance, and understanding.

International Translation Day

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International Translation Day
 
Languages, with their complex implications for identity, communication, social integration, education, and development, are of strategic importance for people and the planet. There are the translators and interpreters who bring cultural narratives alive as they convey them to a wider and cross-cultural audience. Each year on 30 September, translators, interpreters, and terminologists are celebrated on the International Translation Day.
 
The International Translation Day is meant as an opportunity to pay tribute to the work of language professionals, which plays an important role in bringing nations together, facilitating dialogue, understanding and cooperation, contributing to development and strengthening of world peace and security. Interpreters of indigenous languages give native speakers a chance to fully participate in cultural life of society and offer equality of access to basic services such as: health care, education, information, and justice in their mother tongue.

International Day For Universal Access to Information

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Informed citizens can make informed decisions. In a world where COVID-19 pandemic has caused chaos and complexity, access to reliable and verified information is more important than ever, in order to encourage healthy behaviours and save lives. Therefore, universal access to information is a cornerstone for an healthy and inclusive knowledgeable societies.

Universal access to information means that everyone has the right to seek, receive, and impart information. This right is an integral part of the right to freedom of expression. Hence, media plays a crucial role in informing the public about issues of interest, but it relies on the ability to seek and receive information, too. Therefore, the right to universal access to information is also bound up with the right to freedom of the press.

International Day of Sign Language

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International Day of Sign Language
 "The United Nations Disability Inclusion Strategy, launched last year, aims to strengthen our efforts to ensure the meaningful participation and full inclusion of people with disabilities in all that we do, including in times of crisis. That is the only way to fulfil the central promise of the 2030 Agenda – to leave no one behind.." — United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres
 
The United Nations General Assembly has proclaimed 23 September as the International Day of Sign Languages in order to raise awareness of the importance of sign language in the full realisation of the human rights of people who are deaf. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities recognises and promotes the use of sign languages. It makes clear that sign languages are equal in status to spoken languages and obligates states parties to facilitate the learning of sign language and promote the linguistic identity of the deaf community.

Internationl Day of Peace

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There is a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, through observing 24 hours of nonviolence and ceasefire. That day is on 21 September, and each year is observed as the International Day of Peace by the civil society organisations and all the stakeholders. The United Nations’ General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.
 
This year, it has been clearer than ever that we are not each other’s enemies. Rather, our common enemy is a tireless virus that threatens our health, security, and very way of life. The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown our world into turmoil and forcibly reminded us that what happens in one part of the planet can impact people everywhere. This is a global health crisis unlike any other, one that is spreading human suffering, destabilising the global economy, and upending the lives of billions of people around the globe.