World Habitat Day

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World Habitat Day
 
This year the World Habitat Day falls on 4 October. In 1985 the United Nations designated the first Monday of October to commemorate the World Habitat Day. The idea is to reflect on the state of the towns and cities and the basic right of all to adequate shelter. It is also intended to remind the world of its collective responsibility for the future of the human habitat.
 
An estimated 1.8 billion people were already living in slums and informal settlements, inadequate housing or in homelessness in our cities worldwide before the pandemic began. Some 3 billion people lack basic hand-washing facilities. This means millions of people worldwide are more likely to experience poor health due to the absence of basic services and exposure to multiple socio-economic and environmental hazards.

International Day of Non-Violence

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International Day of Non-Violence
 
Each year, on 2 October, we celebrate the International Day of Non-Violence and the birthday of a man who helped bring forward the notion of “non-violence”. The name of Mahatma Gandhi transcends the bounds of race, religion, and nation-states. He is also remembered for his passionate adherence to the practice of nonviolence and supreme humanism.
 
On the International Day of Non-Violence, created by the United Nations in 2007, we look back on how Gandhi’s work and legacy has impacted global non-violent protests, marches, and vigils. This day is recognised and commemorated as a means of reaffirming the universal relevance of the principle of non-violence and the desire to secure a culture of peace, tolerance, and understanding. The COVID-19 pandemic is known for hitting the underprivileged and marginalised groups the hardest. Violence is learnt and, thus, avoidable.

International Day of Peace

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web banners int d peace
 
The International Day of Peace is observed annually on 21 September, and is devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, through observing 24 hours of nonviolence and ceasefire. The United Nations’ General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.
 
This day is celebrated by standing up against acts of hate online and offline, and by spreading compassion, kindness, and hope in the face of the pandemic, and as we recover. The COVID-19 pandemic is known for hitting the underprivileged and marginalised groups the hardest. As we heal from this pandemic, we are inspired to think creatively and collectively about a better recovery, and having our world transform into one that is more equal, just, equitable, inclusive, sustainable, and healthier.

International Day of Peace

on .

web banners int d peace
 
The International Day of Peace is observed annually on 21 September, and is devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, through observing 24 hours of nonviolence and ceasefire. The United Nations’ General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.
This day is celebrated by standing up against acts of hate online and offline, and by spreading compassion, kindness, and hope in the face of the pandemic, and as we recover. The COVID-19 pandemic is known for hitting the underprivileged and marginalised groups the hardest. As we heal from this pandemic, we are inspired to think creatively and collectively about a better recovery, and having our world transform into one that is more equal, just, equitable, inclusive, sustainable, and healthier.

International Day of Democracy

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International Day of Democarcy
 
The values of freedom, respect for human rights, and the principle of holding periodic and genuine elections by universal suffrage are essential elements of democracy. Hence, the International Day of Democracy is celebrated annually on 15 September and it provides an opportunity to review the state of democracy in the world. As democracy provides the natural environment for the protection and effective realisation of human rights. The major purpose of this Day is to encourage everyone, including governments, to protect human rights and participate meaningfully in democracy.
 
The International Day of Democracy is commemorated to educate the public about pressing issues, organise political will and resources to address global issues, and celebrate humanity's achievements. Hence, this year’s theme for the International Day of Democracy is “Strengthening democratic resilience in the face of future crises”. The unprecedented COVID-19 crisis has resulted in major social, political, and legal challenges globally. Time has come to learn from the past lessons in order to strengthen democratic resilience in the face of future crises. We need to commit safeguarding of equality, participation, and solidarity for all.